The Works of Mr. A. Cowley: In Prose and Verse, 1권

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John Sharpe, 1809

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ii 페이지 - ... relates, irrecoverably a poet. Such are the accidents which, sometimes remembered, and, perhaps, sometimes forgotten, produce that particular designation of mind, and propensity for some certain science or employment, which is com.monly called genius. The true genius is a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction.
165 페이지 - For modes of faith let graceless zealots fight; His can't be wrong whose life is in the right...
lii 페이지 - Our two souls therefore, which are one, Though I must go, endure not yet A breach, but an expansion, Like gold to airy thinness beat. If they be two, they are two so As stiff twin compasses are two; Thy soul, the fix'd foot, makes no show To move, but doth, if th
xxviii 페이지 - ... a combination of dissimilar images or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike. Of wit, thus denned, they have more than enough. The most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence together...
61 페이지 - If I should tell the politic arts To take and keep men's hearts ; The letters, embassies, and spies, The frowns, and smiles, and flatteries, The quarrels, tears, and perjuries (Numberless, nameless, mysteries...
28 페이지 - Women love't, either in Love or Dress. A thousand different shapes it bears, Comely in thousand shapes appears. Yonder we saw it plain ; and here 'tis now, Like Spirits in a Place, we know not How.
164 페이지 - And bade to form her infant mind. Stern, rugged nurse ! thy rigid lore With patience many a year she bore ; What sorrow was, thou bad'st her know, And from her own she learn'd to melt at others...
lxxxix 페이지 - His spear, — to equal which, the tallest pine Hewn on Norwegian hills, to be the mast Of some great ammiral, were but a wand...
lxxx 페이지 - Wash'd from the morning beauties' deepest red; An harmless flaming meteor shone for hair, And fell adown his shoulders with loose care; He cuts out a silk mantle from the skies, Where the most sprightly azure...
81 페이지 - Thou dost drink, and dance, and sing, Happier than the happiest king ! All the fields which thou dost see, All the plants belong to thee ; All that summer hours produce, Fertile made with early juice. Man for thee does sow and plough ; Farmer he, and landlord thou ! Thou dost innocently joy ; Nor does thy luxury destroy.

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