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Haggerdon?-O your Royal Highness! have you forgot her ?" "I have, upon my word!" cried he, plumply ; upon my soul I have!" Then turning again to me, "I am very happy, ma'am," he cried, "to see you here; it gives me great pleasure the Queen should appoint the sister of a sea-officer to so eligible a situation. As long as she has a brother in the service, ma'am," cried he to Mrs. Schwellenberg, "I look upon her as one of us. O faith I do! I do indeed! she is one of our corps." Then he said he had been making acquaintance with a new princess, one he did not know nor remember-Princess Amelia. Mary, too," he said, "I had quite forgot; and they did not tell me who she was; so I went up to her, and, without in the least recollecting her, she's so monstrously grown, I said, 'Pray, ma'am, are you one of the attendants?" Princess Sophia is his professed favourite. "I have had the honour," he cried, "of about an hour's conversation with that young lady, in the old style; though I have given up my mad frolics now. To be sure, I had a few in that style formerly!-upon my word I am almost ashamed!-Ha! ha! ha!" Then, recollecting particulars, he laughed vehemently, but Mrs. Schwellenberg eagerly interrupted his communications; I fancy some of them might have related to her own sacred person! Augusta," he said, "looks very well,—a good face and countenance, she looks interesting, she looks as if she knew more than she would say; and I like that character." He stayed a full hour, chatting in this good-humoured and familiar manner.

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A birth-day scene gives us a still more characteristic display of the sailor royal, and almost under the very eye of the sovereign:

At dinner Mrs. Schwellenberg presided, attired magnificently. Miss Goldsworthy, Mrs. Stainforth, Messrs. De Luc and Stanhope dined with us; and, while we were still eating fruit, the Duke of Clarence entered. He was just risen from the King's table, and waiting for his equipage to go home and prepare for the ball. To give you an idea of the energy of his Royal Highness's language, I ought to set apart a general objection to writing, or rather intimating, certain forcible words, and beg leave to show you, in genuine colours, a royal sailor. We all rose, of course, upon his entrance, and the two gentlemen placed themselves behind their chairs, while the footmen left the room; but he ordered us all to sit down, and called the men back to hand about some wine. He was in exceeding high spirits and in the utmost good humour. He placed himself at the head of the table, next Mrs. Schwellenberg, and looked remarkably well, gay, and full of sport and mischief, yet clever withal as well as comical. 'Well, this is the first day I have ever dined with the King at St. James's on his birthday, Pray have you all drank His Majesty's health?" "No, your Roy'l Highness: your Roy'l Highness might make dem do dat," said Mrs. Schwellenberg. "O, by will I! Here, you (to the footman); bring champagne! I'll drink the king's health again, if I die for it; Yet I have done pretty well already: so has the King, I promise you! I believe His Majesty was never taken such good care of before. We have kept his spirits up, I promise you; we have enabled him to go through his fatigues; and I should have done more still, but for the ball and Mary-I have promised to dance with Mary!" Princess Mary made her first appearance at court to-day: she looked most

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interesting and unaffectedly lovely; she is a sweet creature, and perhaps, in point of beauty, the first of this truly beautiful race, of which the Princess Mary may be called pendant to the Prince of Wales. Champagne being now brought for the Duke, he ordered it all round. When it came to me I whispered to Westerhaults to carry it on: the Duke slapped his hand violently on the table and called out, “O, by -, you shall drink it!" There was no resisting this. We all stood up, and the Duke sonorously gave the Royal toast. "And now," cried he, making us all sit down again, where are my rascals of servants? I shan't be in time for the ball; besides, I've got a deuced tailor waiting to fix on my epaulette! Here, you, go and see for my servants! d'ye hear? Scamper off!" Off ran William. Come, let's have the King's health again. De Luc, drink it. Here, champagne to De Luc!" I wish you could have seen Mr. De Luc's mixed simper-half pleased, half alarmed. However, the wine came and he drank it, the Duke taking a bumper for himself at the same time. "Poor Stanhope!" cried he; "Stanhope shall have a glass too! Here, champagne! What are you all about? Why don't you give champagne to poor Stanhope ?” Mr. Stanhope, with great pleasure, complied, and the Duke again accompanied him. "Come hither, do you hear?" cried the Duke to the servants : and on the approach, slow and submissive, of Mrs. Stainforth's man, he hit him a violent slap on the back, calling out "Hang you! why don't you see for my rascals?" Away flew the man, and then he called out to Westerhaults, "Harkee! bring another glass of champagne to Mr. De Luc!" Mr. De Luc knows these royal youths too well to venture at so vain an experiment as disputing with them; so he only shrugged his shoulders and drank the wine. The Duke did the same. "And now, poor Stanhope,"

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quite droll!"

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cried the Duke; "give another glass to poor Stanhope, d'ye hear?" not your Royal Highness afraid," cried Mr. Stanhope, displaying the full circle of his borrowed teeth, "I shall be apt to be rather up in the world, as the folks say, if I tope on at this rate?" "Not at all! You can't get drunk in a better cause. I'd get drunk myself, if it was not for the ball. Here, champagne another glass for the philosopher! I keep sober for Mary. "O, your Royal Highness!" cried Mr. De Luc, gaining courage as he drank, you will make me quite droll of it if you make me go on,"So much the better! so much the better! it will do you a monstrous deal of good. Here, another glass of champagne for the Queen's philosopher!" Mr. De Luc obeyed, and the Duke then addressed Mrs. Schwellenberg's George. "Here! you! why, where is my carriage? run and see, do you hear!" Off hurried George, grinning irrepressibly. "If it was not for that deuced tailor, I would not stir. I shall dine at the Queen's house on Monday, Miss Goldsworthy; I shall come to dine with the Princess Royal. I find she does not go to Windsor with the Queen." Queen meant to spend one day at Windsor, on account of a review which carried the King that way. Some talk then ensued upon the Duke's new carriage, which they all agreed to be the most beautiful that day at Court. I had not seen it, which, to me, was some impediment against praising it. He then said it was necessary to drink the Queen's health. The gentlemen here made no demur, though Mr. De Luc arched his eyebrows in expressive fear of consequences. "A bumper," cried the Duke, "to the Queen's

VOL. I. (1843) NO. 1.

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gentleman-usher." They all stood up and drank the Queen's health. Here are three of us," cried the Duke, "all belonging to the Queen : the Queen's philosopher, the Queen's gentleman-usher, and the Queen's son; but, thank Heaven, I am nearest!" "Sir," cried Mr. Stanhope, a little affronted, "I am not now the Queen's gentleman-usher; I am the Queen's equerry, sir." "A glass more of champagne here! What are you

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all so slow for? Where are all my rascals gone? They've put me in one passion already this morning. Come, a glass of champagne for the Queen's gentleman-usher!" laughing heartily. "No sir," repeated Mr. Stanhope, "I am equerry now, sir.' "And another glass to the Queen's philosopher!” Neither gentleman objected; but Mrs. Schwellenberg, who had sat laughing and happy all this time, now grew alarmed, and said, "Your Royal Highness, I am afraid for the ball!" Hold you your potatoe-jaw, my dear," cried the Duke, patting her; but recollecting himself, he took her hand and pretty abruptly kissed it, and then, flinging it hastily away, laughed aloud, and called out, "There, that will make amends for anything, so now I may say what I will. So here! a glass of champagne for the Queen's philosopher and the Queen's gentleman-usher! Hang me if it will not do them a monstrous deal of good!" Here news was brought that the equipage was in order. He started up, calling out, "Now, then, for my deuced tailor.' "O, your Royal Highness!" cried Mr. De Luc, in a tone of expostulation, 66 now you have made us droll, you go!" Off, however, he went.

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The present portion of the Diary abounds with characters, several of them introduced by Miss Burney for the first time in her pages, as well as with sketches of scenery and still life. Some of these characters, independently of bad health and struggling spirits, helped by their flatteries and persuasions to wean her from toilette attendance on "the sweet Queen." Johnson's Bozzy, for example, cried "Why do you stay? It won't do, ma'am! you must resign!--we can put up with it no longer. I told my good host, the bishop, last night, we are all grown quite outrageous!" And Horace Walpole declared that she "had beeen royally gagged, and promoted to fold muslins." At length she did retire from the royal service, in July 1791, after five years' anxiously honest and devoted attendance, and with a generous appreciation of the kindness and personal worth of her mistress. This might be illustrated by many passages; but one must suffice, in order too that we may have at the same time certain agreeable notices of the celebrated Whig beauty, the Duchess of Devonshire.

I did not find so much beauty in her as I expected, notwithstanding the variations of accounts: but I found far more of manners, politeness, and gentle quiet. She seems by nature to possess the highest animal spirits, but she appeared to me not happy. I thought she looked oppressed within, though there is a native cheerfulness about her which I fancy scarce ever deserts her. There is in her face, especially when she speaks, a sweetness of good-humour and obligingness, that seem to be the natural and instinctive qualities of her disposition, joined to an openness of countenance that an

nounces her endowed, by nature, with a character intended wholly for honesty, fairness, and good purposes. She now conversed with me wholly, and in so soberly sensible and quiet a manner, as I had imagined incompatible with her powers. Too much and too little credit have variously been given her. About me and my health she was more civil than I can well tell you; not from prudery-I have none, in these records, methinks!-but from its being mixed into all that passed. We talked over my late tour, Bath waters, and the King's illness. This, which was led to by accident, was here a tender subject, considering her heading the Regency squadron; however, I have only one line to pursue, and from that I can never vary. I spoke of my own deep distress from his sufferings without reserve, and of the distress of the Queen with the most avowed compassion and respect. She was extremely well-bred in all she said herself, and seemed willing to keep up the subject. I fancy no one has just in the same way treated it with her grace before; however, she took all in good part, though to have found me retired in discontent had perhaps been more congenial to her. But I have been sedulous to make them all know the contrary. Nevertheless, as I am eager to be considered apart from all party, I was much pleased, after all this, to have her express herself very desirous to keep up our acquaintance, ask many questions as to the chance of my remaining in Bath, most politely hope to profit from it, and, finally, inquire my direction.

Among the new characters, several will be found to have stood for dramatis person that afterwards figured in the diarist's "Camilla." But not to pause over these, or even to mention their names, we hasten to introduce a notice or two of certain members of the colony of French noblesse, that became established near Mickleham, as refugees from France during the sanguinary hurricane of the revolution. At the head of this colony was Madame de Staël; who was instantly declared by Miss Burney to be one of the first women she had ever met with "for abilities and extraordinary intellect.”

She

She is a woman of the first abilities, I think, I have ever seen; she is more in the style of Mrs. Thrale than of any other celebrated character, but she has infinitely more depth, and seems an even profound politician and metaphysician. She has suffered us to hear some of her works in MS., which are truly wonderful, for powers both of thinking and expression. She adores her father, but is much alarmed at having had no news from him since he has heard of the massacre of the martyred Louis; and who can wonder it should have overpowered him? Ever since her arrival she has been pressing me to spend some time with her before I return to town. wanted Susan and me to pass a month with her, but, finding that impossible, she bestowed all her entreaties upon me alone, and they are grown so urgent, upon my preparation for departing, and acquainting her my furlough of absence was over, that she not only insisted upon my writing to you, and telling why I deferred my return, but declares she will also write herself, to ask your permission for the visit. She exactly resembles Mis. Thrale in the ardour and warmth of her temper and partialities. I find her impossible to resist, and therefore if your answer to her is such as I conclude it must be, I shall wait upon her for a week.

M. de Talleyrand might well be named along with the daughter of M. Necker; and was also conspicuous in the colony. He is in a moment characterized as a person of "infinite wit and sagacity;" that "it is inconceivable what a convert he has made of me ;" and that "I consider him now one of the first members, and one of the most charming, of this exquisite set." His powers are pronounced to be "astonishing, both in information and in raillery." An extract from a letter will give a touch or two more :—

Mickleham, April 3rd.

After I had sent off my letter to you on Monday I walked on to Juniper, and entered at the same moment with Mr. Jenkinson and his attorney-a man whose figure strongly resembles some of Hogarth's most ill-looking personages, and who appeared to me to be brought as a kind of spy, or witness of all that was passing. I would have retreated, fearing to interrupt business, but I was surrounded, and pressed to stay, by Madame de Staël with great impressement, and with much kindness by M. d'Arblay and all the rest. Mr. Clarke was the spokesman, and acquitted himself with great dignity and moderation; Madame de S. now and then came forth with a little coquetterie pour adoucir ce sauvage Jenkinson. "What will you, Mr. Jenkinson? tell to me, what will you?" M. de Narbonne, somewhat indigné de la mauvaise foi and excédé des longueurs de son adversaire, was not quite so gentle with him, and I was glad to perceive that he meant to resist, in some degree at least, the exorbitant demands of his landlord. Madame de Staël was very gay, and M. de Talleyrand very comique this evening; he criticised, amongst other things, her reading of prose, with great sang froid: "Vous lisez très mal la prose : vous avez un chant en lisant, une cadence, et puis une monotonie, qui n'est pas bien du tout: en vous écoutant on croit toujours entendre des vers, et cela a un fort mauvais effet!" They talked over a number of their friends and acquaintance with the utmost unreserve, and sometimes with the most comic humour imaginable,―M. de Lally, M. de Lafayette, la Princesse d'Henin, la Princesse de Poix, a M. Guibert, an author, and one who was, Madame de S. told me, passionately in love with her before she married,—and innumerable others.

We merely add, that one of the French colonists was the fascinating Chevalier D'Arblay, to whom "little Fanny Burney," with a romance, that could hardly have been expected from a lady of her years and intercourse with the world, became suddenly enamoured, giving him her hand, in spite of a loving and beloved father's hopes and wishes. Was there not sentiment and sensibility in the Burney after all?

ART. III.-Recollections of Siberia, in the years 1840 and 1841. By C. H. COTTRELL, Esq. Parker.

MR. COTTRELL'S Recollections of Siberia will scarcely accord with the views and anticipations of those persons who possess a Russophobian feeling, and who have been in the habit of regarding the

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