The Winter's Tale

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J.B. Lippincott Company, 1898 - 432페이지
 

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38 페이지 - This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, often the surfeit of our own behaviour, we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars...
380 페이지 - And do they not know that a tragedy is tied to the laws of poesy, and not of history; not bound to follow the story, but having liberty either to feign a quite new matter, or to frame the history to the most tragical conveniency?
185 페이지 - I told you what would come of this : beseech you, Of your own state take care : this dream of mine, — Being now awake, I'll queen it no inch farther, But milk my ewes and weep.
383 페이지 - Perhaps, what I have here not dogmatically, but deliberately written, may recall the principles of the drama to a new examination. I am almost frighted at my own temerity ; and when I estimate the fame and the strength of those that maintain the contrary opinion, am ready to sink down in reverential silence ; as JEneas withdrew from the defence of Troy, when he saw Neptune shaking the wall, and Juno heading the besiegers.
380 페이지 - ... gave him such delight that he was content to purchase it by the sacrifice of reason, propriety, and truth. A quibble was to him the fatal Cleopatra for which he lost the world and was content to lose it. It will be thought strange...
381 페이지 - From the narrow limitation of time necessarily arises the contraction of place. The spectator, who knows that he saw the first act at Alexandria, cannot suppose that he sees the next at Rome, at a distance to which not the dragons of Medea could, in so short a time, have transported him ; he knows with certainty that he has not changed his place ; and he knows that place cannot change itself; that what was a house cannot become a plain ; that what was Thebes can never be Persepolis.
72 페이지 - And, stretched out all the chimney's length, Basks at the fire his hairy strength ; And crop-full out of doors he flings, Ere the first cock his matin rings. Thus done the tales, to bed they creep, By whispering winds soon lulled asleep.
381 페이지 - Delusion, if delusion be admitted, has no certain limitation; if the spectator can be once persuaded, that his old acquaintance are Alexander and Caesar, that a room illuminated with candles is the plain of Pharsalia, or the bank of Granicus, he is in a state of elevation above the reach of reason, or of truth, and from the heights of empyrean poetry, may despise the circumscriptions of terrestrial nature.
381 페이지 - It is false, that any representation is mistaken for reality ; that any dramatick fable in its materiality was ever credible, or, for a single moment, was ever credited.
381 페이지 - He has not, indeed, an intrigue regularly perplexed and regularly unravelled; he does not endeavour to hide his design only to discover it, for this is seldom the order of real events, and Shahespeare is the poet of nature : But his plan has commonly what Aristotle requires, a beginning, a middle, and an end ; one event is concatenated with another, and the conclusion follows by easy consequence.

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