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MARCH 26, 1974. Dr. WILLIAM F. FORE, Chairperson, Advisory Council of National Organizations, Washington, D.C.

DEAR DR. FORE: I appreciate you sending to me a copy of the Advisory Council's resolution in support of access by the broadcast media to congressional deliberations. Your interest in our work in this area will be most helpful to us in the development of any recommendations the Joint Committee may make as a result of the hearings presently underway on Congress and Mass Communications.

Because of your interest, we will make sure that you receive a copy of the hearings record as soon as it is printed, probably in mid-April.

Meanwhile, I will offer your letter and the resolution for the record at our next hearing on April 9. Very truly yours,

LEE METCALF.

ADVISORY COUNCIL OF NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS,

Washington, D.C., March 19, 1974. Hon. LEE METCALF, Chairman, Joint Committee on Congressional Operations, Longworth House Office

Building, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. METCALF: The Advisory Council of National Organizations to CPB (ACNO), meeting in Washington on March 5, 1974, unanimously passed the following resolution in strong support of access by the broadcast media to Congressional deliberations:

“The Advisory Council of National Organizations moves that the Congress provide regular, on-the-record and full disclosure of its deliberations by the broadcast media as a matter of future policy. Further, it is moved that this disclosure include the full spectrum of public Congressional activities, from committee and committee mark up hearings to floor debates. ACNO moves the above as a matter of the electorate's right to know, not merely in summary, but in detail, the deliberations of their elected representatives."

After reviewing the statements made before the Joint Committee on Congressional Operations, the Advisory Council further endorses the type of plan outlined in the presentation of Henry Loomis, President of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

We hope this resolution and letter will be included in the record of the proceedings. Sincerely,

Dr. WILLIAM F. FORE Chairperson, Advisory Council of National Organizations.

MARCH 27, 1974. Mr. MICHAEL J. SALES, San Francisco, Calif.

Dear si. DALES: Thank you very much for your thoughtful comments on opening Congress, via the communications media, to enable the American people to learn more about the institutional role and the day-by-day activities of their National Legislature.

Because of your interest, I am enclosing a study entitled, “Congress and Mass Communication: An Institutional Perspective." This study was prepared by the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress at the request of the Joint Committee on Congressional Operations. It contains background material for use by the Committee in preparation for our hearings, which began in February and are scheduled to continue through April.

I trust that you will find the information contained in this study useful. Again, my thanks for your letter and comments on the work of the Joint Committee. Very truly yours,

LEE METCALF. Enclosure.

FEBRUARY 26, 1974. DEAR SENATOR METCALF: I am passing this letter along to show ny support of television in government.

I think that an obvious distribution channel for Congressional programming is the governmental access channel available on every CATV system in the nation's top 100 markets. I hope to do this kind of work someday, so I'm excited about this idea.

MICHAEL SALES

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., February 23, 1974. Senator EDMUND MUSKIE, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR: I read with approval your recent statements on the need for a televised Congress. I am a graduate student in the field of Broadcasting and I have felt for a long time that our newer electronic media should play a more important role in the dissemination of governmental information. The pace of events in our time is already inductively creating a necessity for a televised government and support by intelligent public figures for such a proposal simply echoes the force of a phenomenon in process.

During my adult life I have been deeply concerned by a series of persistent crises facing our nation: senseless militarism leading to the debacle of Vietnam; an inefficient and unfair distribution of wealth resulting in widespread poverty and misery; and a lack of moral integrity and good sense in all areas of social life culminating in the sensibility offending election of Richard Nixon and his subsequent attack on our national institutions. This latter illness I view as most important because I believe it saps the creativity and resourcefulness of our people while feeding the poisonous waters of alienation that nurture irrationality.

I believe that it is within the power of television to alleviate these difficult problems. The complexity of our society can no longer afford the centralized decision-making that has so characterized the last forty years of our national life. By providing people with the basic information about problems and potentials facing our society, television can relieve the burden of responsibility placed upon our elected representatives who must now be making many more decisions than they should (a responsibility which, I believe you have noted, the public does not believe is being met by the Congress). Most important, this new availability of information through our most modern and efficient communications medium shift the decision making process back to the People at large and thereby help us all to become more mature and active citizens. A Fellow American,

MICHAEL J. SALES.

MARCH 27, 1974. Mrs. W. R. CONDRA, Baytown, Tex.

DEAR MRS. CONDRA: Thank you very much for your thoughtful comments on opening Congress, via the communications media, to enable the American people to learn more about the institutional role and the day-by-day activities of their National Legislature.

Because of your interest, I am enclosing a study entitled, “Congress and Mass Communications: An Institutional Perspective.” This study was prepared by the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress at the request of the Joint Committee on Congressional Operations. It contains background material for use by the Committee in preparation for our hearings, which began in February and are scheduled to continue through April.

I trust that you will find the information contained in this study useful. Again, my thanks for your letter and comments on the work of the Joint Committee. Very truly yours,

LEE METCALF. Enclosure.

BAYTOWN, Tex., February 22, 1974. Hon. SENATOR LEE METCALF, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR METCALF: I am interested in something I read in a media magazine, T.V. Guide an issue for the weeks of February 23-March 1st. In an

article by Richard K. Dean, entitled “Congress on Television", it was stated that you are Chairman of a "Joint Committee on Congressional Operations" and that the “Pros and cons of giving radio and television access to the House and Senate chambers" would be aired. Not knowing how long such committees meet or whether the resulting decisions are made public immediately, I still am interested in expressing my opinion. Although I am sure that your people are more capable, having all the information at hand, in deciding whether something comes about or doesn't, I am throwing in my 2 cents worth. I addressed a letter similar to this to Senator John Tower. At this time, I am "fer" it.

My first real insight into the workings of government committees came through the Watergate coverage. I am sorry that although the overall objective was to show the people that the government was at work sorting through the confusion and bringing to surface the truths, it was still a negative introduction. For myself and many others, however, the hearings were enlightening and educational. I was both shocked and then reassured by just realizing that this Nation's growth and progress rests in the hands of human beings with quirks, faults and misconceptions ... pleased by it too since we saw on the faces and heard in their voices their respect for the situation and how it would be handled. It made me aware of many good things but most of all, it sparked an interest that has not waned. Although I am not a learned person, I have been reading more, listening carefully and am anxious about all that is going on up there". If indeed the Presidency, which was at one time considered with awe, has been opened for scrutiny

. it is something long overdue and only coincides with the growth and changes coming about in this Nation. Whether it is good remains to be seen by how these new attitudes are fashioned.

If the media were permitted coverage of whatever areas decided, if the people were once again allowed to see, hear and be touched by hearings and debates, there would be reaction but it could all have positive results. As it seems to be now, people are becoming a part of movements, groups and organizations, wanting to be a deciding factor but still not really aware of or satisfied with what they can do. This is because we do not really understand what is going on. It is not ignorence. For the most part, many folks do not consider themselves worthy of having opinion or say. Bringing this government workings into the homes where we are personally touched, might bring about a sort of balance. We will understand "Why" some things happen and honestly be able to judge for ourselves how we feel and want to react.

I am sorry that there is so much negative opinion around our country. It will be a while before people realize that the media do not always offer unbiased reports and yet, for many folks, we depend on this coverage . .. what we read in news magazines and do not want to believe that it is only half of a truth. It is difficult to sort through reports and commentaries and come away feeling that something has been settled. I was interested in an incident that occurred over a radio program recently that made an impression. For an hour or so, a host allowed his audience to call in with their opinions about Watergate, the energy crisis, etc. The first caller sparked off a chain of negative response . . He said he was down on the government and everyone else who called said the same thing in one way or another. The next hour, the host said something good about our President ... and was showered with calls from people who had something good to say. It was a rally of sorts and very rare to hear, but it was there and still is. Regardless of what we know or think about our President, the Government or politics, .. people latch on to what hits closest to home. Television is a tool that has unlimited power with certain segments of our population. I believe that the time has past for it to be just an entertaining medium. I am for special networks ... Education networks, sports networks and have already wondered why someone didn't consider bringing the government into it. It all has to be handled with much care and respect... there's the clincher. If this is not possible... if it turns into entertainment or past times, it will not be of any value. However, if such a project was tried, the possibilities are endless, the results could serve to educate and reassure this country. And there are other ways of looking at it too ..ideas that I do not have access to and am interested in.

I am interested in knowing how long it takes for a matter such as this to be considered and how one goes about finding out what the discussion consisted of and what conclusions were made.

Thank you for your time and attention. It is good to know that this letter will be read. God bless each of you. Yours truly,

Mrs. W. R. Condra.

MARCH 27, 1974. Mr. James F. SPILLANE, Bronx, N.Y.

DEAR MR. SPILLANE: Thank you very much for your thoughtful comments on opening Congress, via the communications media, to enable the American people to learn more about the institutional role and the day-by-day activities of their National Legislature.

Because of your interest, I am enclosing a study entitled, “Congress and Mass Communications: An Institutional Perspective." This study was prepared by the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress at the request of the Joint Committee on Congressional Operations. It contains background material for use by the Committee in preparation for our hearings, which began in February and are scheduled to continue through April.

I trust that you will find the information contained in this study useful. Again, my thanks for your letter and comments on the work of the Joint Committee. Very truly yours,

LEE METCALF. Enclosure.

Bronx, N.Y., February 23, 1974. Hon. LEE METCALF, Chairman, Joint Committee on Congressional Operations, Congress of the United

States, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: While viewing the Watergate hearings on television, I was really impressed with watching government at work. At the time I was struck with the idea that television coverage should be expanded to include not just Senate Committee hearings but the full spectrum of Congress at work. I though then and still do that it would be good for the people to see the Congress pursuing the people's business.

During the past few years the President has had commanding use of television to get the administration's viewpoint across. The American people would be well served by having the opportunity to see Congress present its own views during the television coverage. This proposed coverage would show Congress as a co-equal branch of government not just as an obstruction to the President.

With the people's faith in government at an all time low, due to the Watergate and other recent disclosures, this Congressional coverage would do a lot in restoring that faith in their elected officials.

Therefore, Mr. Chairman, I urge you and your conferees to propose that Congressional proceedings be fully televised. This television coverage should be an open-door policy as television has with the United Nations. This open-door policy would not only keep the people informed on government business but would go a long way in keeping Congress on its toes, too. Sincerely yours,

JAMES F. SPILLANE.

MARCH 27, 1974. Mr. DAVID J. SCHMERER, Producer, Radio Station WFSU-FM, the Florida Sla!e University, Tallahassee,

Fla.

DEAR MR. SCHMERER: Thank you very much for your thoughtful comments on opening Congress, via the communications media, to enable the American people to learn more about the institutional role and the day-by-day activities of their National Legislature.

Because of your interest, I am enclosing a study entitled, “Congress and Mass Communications: An Institutional Perspective." This study was prepared by the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress at the request of the Joint Committee on Congressional Operations. It contains background material for use by the Committee in preparation for our hearings, which began in Febuary and are scheduled to continue through April.

I trust that you will find the information contained in this study useful. Again, my thanks for your letter and comments on the work of the Joint Committee. Very truly yours,

LEE METCALF. Enclosure.

THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY,

Tallahassee, March 5, 1974. Senator LEE METCALF, Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR METCALF: We here at Public Radio News wish to commend you and the other members of the Joint Committee on Congressional Operations, for finally taking steps to improve communications between Congress and the public.

Being producer of a program which capsules the weekly activities of the Florida delegation, I find it increasingly difficult to air a timely, newsworthy program. Our primary sources of information are newsletters, which contain mostly public relations, and the Congressional Record, which arrives a week late.

I find it frustrating to have to consistently prepare programs with outdated information. A news program should be able to broadcast the latest news, news as it develops; and to have to rely on newsletters and out-of-date congressional publications is both a burden and a restraint on our right and responsibility to present to our listening public the most current of the news and activities which emanate from the Washington scene daily.

I suggest that the members of Congress should send tapes to all members of the mass media who presently receive their newsletters, I'm sure that every congressman has one or two radio stations or newspapers on his list. The tapes could be sent out once a week and should contain exactly what that representative or senator has done in the way of sponsoring or co-sponsoring legislation, his or her support or dissapproval of important issues and supportive reasons, and the results of any committee meeting he or she deems as relevant.

Any broadcaster will tell you that actualities (actual voice tracks) on a program will make for better listening, which leads to a growth of interest and increased popularity. What better place for a representative to communicate to his constituency than to be heard or seen on a popular radio or T.V. program.

I submit that part of the problem lies with the Congress for waiting for the media to request the information and the other part lies with the media for not pushing harder to get the news from the Congress. I am not referring to the Washington press corp, Senator, I am referring to the thousands of local radio and television stations, newspapers and magazines who should be presenting to the represented the work of their representatives.

Providing tapes is not a difficult proposition, nor is it an expensive one. I'm sure that many Representatives and Senators do cooperate in this manner, but I'm also sure that many do not. If you wish to explore this possibility, I'm sure that Representative Bill Gunter of Florida could provide your committee with insights into the feasibility of such a proposal - we receive a tape from him every week; or perhaps Senator Chiles of Florida will be available to discuss the use of the WATS line for such a purpose his office calls us every Friday and provides us with a weekly rundown of the Senator's activities.

Senator Metcalf, I hope that you will construe the meaning of this letter as a little concern and a lot of constructive criticism. Again I wish you and your colleagues the best of luck in your exploration of this subject, and if I have at least provided a little food for thought then I have accomplished a lot. Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely,

DAVID J. SCHMERER, Producer.

March 27, 1974. Mr. and Mrs. ALVIN HARRIS, New Castle, Ind.

DEAR MR. AND MRS. HARRIS: Thank you very much for your thoughtful comments on opening Congress, via the communications media, to enable the American people to learn more about the institutional role and the day-by-day activities of their National Legislature.

Because of your interest, I am enclosing a study entitled, “Congress and Mass Communications: An Institutional Perspective." This study was prepared by the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress at the request of the Joint Committee on Congressional Operations. It contains background material

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