페이지 이미지
PDF
ePub

War.

Conceit.
Statesmanship.

Temperance.
Fashion.
Victory.

Toasts.
Flattery.
World Peace.

Water.
Pride.
Self-love.
Washington, 860.

Winter, 877.
America.

December. Variety, 830.

Government.

Wisdom, 878.
Change.
Patriotism.

Discretion.
Choice.
Watchfulness, see

Education.
Novelty.
Observation.

Folly.
Venice, 831.

Prudence.

Knowledge. Sight.

Learning. Vice, 831.

Mind.
Bribery.
Water, 862.

Truth.
Corruption.

Brooks.
Crime.

Cleanliness.

Wishes, 882.
Evil.
Dew.

Anticipation.
Guilt.
Drinking.

Desire.
Ignorance.
Navigation.

Imagination.
Sin.

Ocean.

Wit, 883.
Wickedness.
Rivers.

Conversation.
Ships.

Humor. Victory, 832.

Shipwreck.

Jesting.
Conquest.
Tides.

Parody.
Glory.

Satire.
Soldiers.
Water-Lily, 863.

Speech.
Success.
Weakness, 863.

Woe, 886.
Cowardice.

Grief.
Villainy, 833.

Fear.

Misery.
Crime.
Frailty.

Suffering.
Guilt.
Knavery.
Wealth, 864.

Tears.
Sin.

Fortune.

Woman, 886.
Vice.
Gold.

Babyhood.
Wickedness.
Mammon.

Beauty.
Money.

Character. Violets, 833.

Possession.

Childhood. Virtue, 835. Weeds, 867.

Coquetry.
Character.

Fickleness.
Garden.
Chastity.
Trees and Plants.

Flirtation.

Husband.
Goodness.
Holiness.
Weeping, see

Jealousy.
Innocence.
Tears.

Kisses.
Truth.

Love.
Welcome, 867.
Wisdom.

Matrimony.
Guests.
Worth.

Motherhood.
Home.

Wife. Visions, 839.

Hospitality.

Wooing.
Angels.

Meeting.

Wonders, 897.
Apparitions.
Fairies.
Whip-Poor-Will, 868.

Imagination.

Invention.
Fancy.
Wickedness, 868.

Miracle.
Imagination.
Corruption.

Science.
Mermaids.
Crime.

Superstition.
Spirits.
Evil.

Visions.
Wonders.

Guilt.
Voice, 840.

Hatred.

Woodbine, 898. Ballads.

Knavery.

Wooing, 898.

Prison.
Conscience.

Coquetry.
Punishment.
Conversation.

Flirtation,
Sin.
Echo.

Kisses.
Vice.
Eloquence.

Love.
Villainy.
Language.

Matrimony.
Music.
Wife, 868.

Sighs.
Oratory.

Woman.
Babyhood.
Song,

Childhood.

Words, 902.
Sound.
Home.

Conversation.
Speech.
Husband.

Eloquence.
Talk.
Love.

Gossip.
Tongue.
Matrimony:

Language.
Words.
Motherhood.

Linguists.

Woman.
Vows, 841.

Oratory.
Wooing.

Scandal.
Oaths.
Promises.
Will, 871.

Silence.
Swearing.
Decision.

Speech.
Deeds.

Talk.
W
Mind.

Tongues.
Power.

Work, 907. Want, see

Resolution.

Action.
Loss.
Strength.

Business. Poverty.

Deeds.
Willow, 872.

Labor.
War, 841.
Wind, 872.

Occupations.
Conquest.
Contention.
November

Prayer.
Democracy.

Storm.
.

World, 911.
Dissension.
Thunder.

Acting.
Government.
Zephyrs.

Chaos.
Heroes.
Windflower, 874.

Creation. Peace.

Life.
Politics.
Wine and Spirits, 874.

Nature.
Polioy.
Drinking.

Society.
Right; Rights.
Intemporance.

Solitude.

CNCES.

xxxi

War.

Temperance.
Toasts.

Water. nter, 877.

December. dom, 878.

Discretion. Education. Folly. Knowledge. Learning Mind.

Truth. hes, 882.

Anticipation.
Desire.
Imagination.
883.
Conversation.
Humor.
Jesting.
Parody.
Satire.
Speech.

TOPICAL INDEX, WITH CROSS-REFERENCES.
World Peace, 917.
Wounds, 920.

Yew, 921.
America.

Affliction.

Youth, 921.
Diplomacy.

Cruelty.
England.
Heroes.

Babyhood.

Childhood.
Germany.

Pain.
Government.
Soldiers.

Enthusiasm.

Heroes.
Peace.
Suffering.

Innocence.
Politics.

War.
Soldiers.

Motherhood.
Statesmanship.
Wrath, see

Simplicity.
War.
Anger.

Zeal.
Wren, 921.
Worship, 918.

Yukon, 924.
Church.
Writing, see

Yvette (River), 924.
Faith.

Authorship.
God.

Books.
Gods, The.
Journalism.

Z
Praise.

Literature.
Prayer.

Zeal, 925.

Pen.
Preaching.

Ambition.
Religion
Wrongs, 921.

Enthusiasm.
Reverence.
Injury.

Labor.
Superstition.
Insult.

Resolution.
Work.

Youth.
Worth, 919
Credit.

Y

Zephyrs, 925.
Merit.

Nature.
Nobility.
Yesterday, see

Storm.
Value.
Past.

Wind.

2, 886.
Grief.
Misery.
Suffering.
Tears.
man, 886.
Babyhood.
Beauty.
Character.
Childhood.
Coquetry.
Fickleness.
Flirtation.
Husband.
Jealousy.
Kisses.
Love.
Matrimony:
Motherhood.
Wife.
Wooing.
ders, 897.
Imagination.
Invention.
Miracle.
Science.
Superstition.
Visions.
dbine, 898.
ing, 898.
Coquetry.
Flirtation,
Kisses.
Love.
Matrimony.
Sighs.
Woman.
is, 902.
Conversation.
Eloquence.
Gossip.
Language.
Linguists.
Oratory.
Scandal.
Silence.
Speech.
Talk.
Tongues.
k, 907.
Action.
Business.
Deeds.
Labor.
Occupations.
Prayer.
d, 911.
Acting.
Chaos.
Creation.
Life.
Nature.
Society.
Solitude.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

The dwarf sees farther than the giant, when he has the giant's shoulders to mount on. COLERIDGE—The Friend. Sect. I. Essay VIII.

(See also BUTLER) Pigmies placed on the shoulders of giants see more than the giants themselves. DIDACTUS STELLA-Lucan. Vol. II. 10. Quoted

by BURTON—Anatomy of Melancholy. Democritus to the Reader.

(See also BUTLER) Could swell the soul to rage, or kindle soft desire.

DRYDEN—Alexander's Feast. L. 160.

15

16

8

As we advance in life, we learn the limits of our abilities. FROUDE-Short Studies on Great Subjects.

Education.

17

ABILITY He'll find a way. BARRIE—Sentimental Tommy. (Corp's belief

in Tommy and Tommy's in himself.) Men who undertake considerable things, even in a regular way, ought to give us ground to presume ability.

BURKE-Reflections on the Revolution in France. For as our modern wits behold, Mounted a pick-back on the old, Much farther off, much further he, Rais'd on his aged Beast, could see. BUTLERHudibras. Pt. I. Canto II. L. 971.

Same idea in MACAULAY Essay on SIR JAMES MACKINTOSH. (See also COLERIDGE, DIDAcus STELLA, HERBERT, SENECA.)

9

Every person is responsible for all the good within the scope of his abilities, and for no more, and none can tell whose sphere is the largest. GAIL HAMILTON —Country Living and Coun

try Thinking. Men and Women. 18

A Dwarf on a Giant's shoulder sees farther of the two. HERBERT Jacula Prudentum.

(See also BUTLER) 19

C'est une grande habileté que de savoir cacher son habileté.

To know how to hide one's ability is great skill.

LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Maximes. 245. 1

10

He could raise scruples dark and nice,
And after solve 'em in a trice:
As if Divinity had catch'd
The itch, on purpose to be scratch'd.

BUTLER-Hudibras. Pt. I. Canto I. L. 163.

[blocks in formation]

In the hope to meet Shortly again, and make our absence sweet. BEN JONSON_Underwoods. Miscellaneous

Poems. LIX.
17
Ever absent, ever near;
Still I see thee, still I hear;
Yet I cannot reach thee, dear!

FRANCIS KAZINCZY—Separation.

18

Illud tamen in primis testandum est, nihil præcepta atqueartes valere nisi adjuvante natura.

One thing, however, I must premise, that without the assistance of natural capacity, rules and precepts are of no efficacy.

QUINTILIANProæmium. I. 4. Die Menschen gehen wie Schiesskugeln weiter, wenn sie abgeglättet sind.

Men, like bullets, go farthest when they are smoothest.

JEAN PAUL RICHTER—Titan. Zykel 26. 5

Parvus pumilio, licet in monte constiterit; colossus magnitudinem suam servabit, etiam si steterit in puteo.

A dwarf is small even if he stands on a mountain; a colossus keeps his height, even if he stands in a well. SENECA-Epistles. 76.

(See also BUTLER) The world is like a board with holes in it, and the square men have got into the round holes.

SYDNEY SMITH, as quoted in Punch.

What shall I do with all the days and hours

That must be counted ere I see thy face? How shall I charm the interval that lowers

Between this time and that sweet time of grace? FRANCES ANNE KEMBLE-Absence. 19 Cum autem sublatus fuerit ab oculis, etiam cito transit a mente.

But when he (man) shall have been taken from sight, he quickly goes also out of mind. THOMAS Å KEMPIS-Imitation of Christ. Bk.

I. Ch. XXIII. 1. 20

Your absence of mind we have borne, till your presence of body came to be called in question by it.

LAMB—Amicus Redivivus.

6

7

21

We shall generally find that the triangular person has got into the square hole, the oblong into the triangular, and a square person has squeezed himself into the round hole.

SYDNEY SMITH-Sketches of Moral Philosophy.

8

22

Read my little fable:

He that runs may read.
Most can raise the flowers now,

For all have got the seed.
TENNYSON—The Flowers.

For with G. D., to be absent from the body is sometimes (not to speak it profanely) to be present with the Lord.

LAMBĻOxford in the Vacation.

L'absence diminue les médiocres passions et augmente les grandes, comme le vent éteint les bougies et allume le feu.

Absence diminishes little passions and increases great ones, as the wind extinguishes candles and fans a fire.

LA ROCHEFOUCAULD-Maximes. 276.

9

23

Les méchants sont toujours surpris de trouver de l'habileté dans les bons.

The wicked are always surprised to find ability in the good.

VAUVENARGUESRéflexions. CIII. Possunt quia posse videntur.

They are able because they think they are able. VERGIL- Æneid. V. 231.

Oft in the tranquil hour of night,

When stars illume the sky,
I gaze upon each orb of light,

And wish that thou wert by.
GEORGE LINLEY—Song.

10

[blocks in formation]

11

25

ABSENCE (See also MEMORY) Absence makes the heart grow fonder.

THOMAS HAYNES BAYLY—Isle of Beauty.

12 Wives in their husbands' absences grow

subtler, And daughters sometimes run off with the butler.

BYRONDon Juan. Canto III. St. 22.

For there's nae luck about the house;
There's nae luck at aw;
There's little pleasure in the house
When our gudeman's awa.

Attributed to W. J. MICKLE—There's Nae

« 이전계속 »