The Theory and Practice of Banking, 1권

앞표지
Longmans, Green, Reader, & Dyer, 1883 - 593페이지
 

다른 사람들의 의견 - 서평 쓰기

서평을 찾을 수 없습니다.

선택된 페이지

목차

On the Application of the Positive and Negative Signs to Property
26
On the Classification of Property
27
Property in Land
28
Personal Credit
29
Every Sum of Money is equivalent to the Sum of the Present Values of an Infinite Series of Future Payments
30
Definition of Value
32
On Money and Credit
33
On the Want which gave rise to the use of Money
34
Nature of Money
35
Money is General Credit
36
Gold and Silver Money are Metallic Credit
40
On Credit
41
Money and Credit are Rights to demand something to be paid or done by some person
43
Reason why Paper can supersede Metallic Money
44
The Distinction between Money and Credit
45
On Barter Sale or Circulation and Exchange
46
On the Meaning of Circulating Medium
48
On the Meaning of Currency
49
The Different Forms of Currency
51
On the Channel of Circulation
52
The Fundamental Concept of Monetary Science
54
On Securities for Money and Convertible Securities
55
On Price
57
The Term Value of Money has Two Distinct Meanings
58
On Production
59
Three Different Classes of Producers
61
On Consumption
62
Great contest between the Bank and the South Sea Company
66
On Confusio in Roman
89
The Release of a Debt may Extinguish an Obligation in Two ways
90
When + 100 cancels 100 and when it does
91
On Payment in Money
92
or Novatio
93
Or Compensation
95
Compensation allowed as a Right
96
Set Off allowed as a Right
97
Examples of Set Off or Compensation
98
On the Quantity of Credit compared to the Quantity of Money
99
Two Branches of the System of Credit
100
CHAPTER II
102
Value is a Ratio or an Equation
105
Distinction between Diminution in Value and Depre
112
SECTION II
118
Even where Labour has been bestowed on anything which
128
SECTION III
135
CHAPTER III
142
Meaning of the Market Price of Gold and Silver
148
CHAPTER IV
157
Advantage of adopting the Conception of Economics as
179
On the Application of the Theory of Algebraical Signs
186
Examples of the Algebraical Signs applied to Operations
192
26 A Person exercising any Profitable Business is an Economic Quantity analagous to Land
196
If Money is termed Positive Capital Credit may be termed Negative Capital
197
On Debts as Negative Quantities
198
SECTION III
200
On the Transfer of Credits or Debts 29 Debts are Saleable Commodities 30 On Property held in Contract or on Jura in Personam 31 Unilateral and Bil...
209
On the Principles of English Law and Equity relating to the Sale or Transfer of Debts
211
Lord Cokes reason erroneous 39 Property under the Feudal System
212
Nature of Feudal Society
213
Appointment of a Royal Commission to prepare a Digest of the
214
Contract between Lord and Vassal
216
On the Rules of the Common Law of England relating to the Transfer of Chosesinaction
218
Feuds and Charters made Assignable 45 Case in which the Debtor had not assented to the Transfer of the Debt
221
Bankers Notes and Cheques
283
Application of Algebra and Roman Law to Commerce
289
CHAPTER V
302
Debts made transferable 4 Credit used by Foreign Merchants
305
Exaggerated Ideas of the Security of Real Bills
306
On Accommodation Bills
307
Distinction between Bills of Exchange and Bills of Lading
309
On Credit created for the purpose of being applied to the Formation of New Products 302 304 305 306 307 309
311
CHAPTER VI
313
On the Meaning of the word Bank
314
Meaning of Bank in English 4 Meaning of the word Banker
318
On the Currency Principle
321
On the Mechanism of Banking
324
On the Common Error respecting Deposits 8 In Banking Language a Deposit and an Issue are
330
On the Legal Relation between Banker and Customer
333
313
343
314
344
318
348
CHAPTER VII
372
To find in what Time a Sum of Money will double itself
378
ON THE FOREIGN EXCHANGES
381
Lord Kings Law of Paper Money
387
On Foreign Exchange
393
221
396
On the Real or Commercial Exchange
401
Further Example
408
Foreign Trade may not require Export of Bullion
414
Payment of the French Indemnity
421
225
422
The India Council Bills
427
193
429
On the Means of Correcting an Adverse Exchange
430
Great scarcity in 1800
433
Afterwards they entrust it to the Goldsmiths
436
Case of the Bankers in the Court of Exchequer and the
442
The third attempt succeeds and an Act passed for the estab
448
Parliamentary proceedings to remedy the disorder
454
PAGE 33 Guineas rise to 30s great fall in the Exchange
457
Lord Somers proposes to make the Coin current by weight instead of by tale
458
Report of Mr Lowndes on the State of the Coin
459
He proposes to alter the current rate of the Coin
460
Reply of Locke
463
Locke demonstrates the futility of Lowndess plan
464
Confusion caused by the bad state of the Coinage
470
Committee appointed by the House of Commons to consider the price of guineasnumerous petitions
471
228
472
Partial suspension of payments at the Bank
473
The Reformation in the Coinage restores the Exchanges to par
474
Projected Land BankBank Notes at 20 per cent discount
475
Parliament undertakes to restore the public credit 1696
476
First Issue of Exchequer Bills
478
Extract from the Bullion Report
479
Certain allegations in this extract
482
This monetary crisis important in the Theory of the Currency
484
Writers of this period always said that Notes were at a dis count and not that Gold had risen
485
The Bank in difficulties in 1704 and 1709
486
Prohibition of Banking partnerships of more than six persons
487
This clause effectual at that time
488
Disorder of the Coinage in 1708
489
Bank of Englands proposals
496
Operations by means of Cheques 330
503
332
513
Advances by the Bank to Government contrary to its Charter
516

기타 출판본 - 모두 보기

자주 나오는 단어 및 구문

인기 인용구

278 페이지 - A bill of exchange is an unconditional order in writing, addressed by one person to another, signed by the person giving it, requiring the person to whom it is addressed to pay on demand or at a fixed or determinable future time a sum certain in money to or to the order of a specified person, or to bearer.
263 페이지 - ... been given to the debtor, trustee, or other person from whom the assignor would have been entitled to receive or claim such debt or chose in action, shall be, and be deemed to have been effectual in law (subject to all equities which would have been entitled to priority over the right of the assignee if this Act had not passed...
487 페이지 - England), or for any other persons whatsoever, ' united or to be united in covenants or partnership, exceeding the ' number of six persons, in that part of Great Britain called ' England, to borrow, owe, or take up any sum or sums of money ' on their bills or notes payable at demand, or at any less time ' than six months from the borrowing thereof.
125 페이지 - ... sweat, is to be counted into the bread we eat; the labour of those who broke the oxen, who digged and wrought the iron and stones, who felled and framed the timber employed about the plough, mill, oven, or any other utensils, which are a vast number, requisite to this corn, from its being...
6 페이지 - Fourthly, of the acquired and useful abilities of all the inhabitants or members of the society. The acquisition of such talents, by the maintenance of the acquirer during his education, study, or apprenticeship, always costs a real expense, which is a capital fixed and realized, as it were, in his person.
125 페이지 - It would be a strange catalogue of things that industry provided and made use of, about every loaf of bread, before it came to our use, if we could trace them; iron, wood, leather, bark, timber, stone, bricks, coals, lime, cloth...
410 페이지 - Dominions of the French King hath much exhausted the Treasure of this Nation lessened the Value of the native Commodities and Manufactures thereof and greatly impoverished the English Artificers and Handycrafts and caused great detriment to this Kingdome in generall Bee it therefore enacted
123 페이지 - ... let any one consider what the difference is between an acre of land planted with tobacco or sugar, sown with wheat or barley, and an acre of the same land lying in common without any husbandry...
263 페이지 - Any absolute assignment, by writing under the hand of the assignor (not purporting to be by way of charge only), of any debt or other legal chose in action, of which express notice in writing shall have been given to the debtor, trustee, or other person from whom the assignor would have been entitled to receive or claim such debt or chose in action...
224 페이지 - That the maintaining of these actions upon such notes, were innovations upon the rules of the common law ; and that it amounted to the setting up a new sort of specialty unknown to the common law, and invented in Lombard street, which attempted in these matters of bills of exchange to give laws to Westminster Hall.

도서 문헌정보