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And such is human life; so gliding on,
It glimmers like a meteor, and is gone!

THE WORLD, wherein we play, is but a stage,
And all the men and women merely players :
They have their exits and their entrances ;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms :
Then, the whining school-boy, with his satchel,
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school : and then, the lover ;
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eye-brow: then, a soldier ;
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth : and then, the justice ;
In fair round belly, with good capon lin'd,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances,
And so he plays his part: the sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipperd pantaloon ;
With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side;
His youthful hose well sav'd, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound : last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness, and mere oblivion;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing.

Shakspeare. His plough and harness by his side. -Spenser.

OBSERVE the daily circle of the sun,
And the short year of each revolving moon.
When first the moon appears, if then she shrouds
Her silver crescent, tipp'd with sable clouds,
Conclude she bodes a tempest on the main,
And brews, for fields, impetuous floods of rain.
Or, if her face with fiery flushing glow,
Expect the rattling winds aloft to blow.
Above the rest, the sun, who never lies,
Foretells the change of weather in the skies.
For, if he rise unwilling to his race,
Clouds on his brow, and spots upon his face,
Or if through mists, he shoots his sullen beams,
Frugal of light, in loose and straggling streams;
Suspect a drizzling day, with southern rain,
Fatal to fruits, and Alocks, and promis'd grain.
But, more than all, the setting sun survey,
When down the steep of heaven he drives the day :
If dusky spots are varied on his brow,
And, streak'd with red, a troubled colour show,
What desp'rate madman, then, would venture o'er
The frith, or haul his cables from the shore ?-Georgicks.

Hail, Bishop Valentine! whose day this is ;

All the air is thy diocese,
And all the chirping choristers,
And other birds, are thy parishioners.

Thou marriest every year
The lyrick lark, and the grave whispering dove,
The sparrow that neglects his life for love,
The household bird, with the red stomacher ;
Thou mak'st the blackbird speed as soon,
As doth the goldfinch, or the halcyon ;
The husband cock looks out, and straight is sped,
And meets his wife, which brings her feather-bed.--Donne.

And such is human life ; so gliding on,
It glimmers like a meteor, and is gone!

The WORLD, wherein we play, is but a stage,
And all the men and women merely players :
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms :
Then, the whining school-boy, with his satchel,
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school : and then, the lover ;
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eye-brow : then, a soldier ;
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth : and then, the justice ;
In fair round belly, with good capon lin'd,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances,
And so he plays his part: the sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipperd pantaloon ;
With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side;
His youthful hose well sav'd, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound : last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness, and mere oblivion ;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing.

Shakspeare.

en 73 woww..

As of the green leaves on a thick tree, some fall, and some grow; so is the generation of flesh and blood, one cometh to an end, and another is born.

Ecclesiasticus.

Day.

Births.

Deaths.

Cal. Tiberius Hemsterhuys, 1685, Cardinal Aleander, 1542.
Groningen.

Edward Finch, 1642.
Cardinal Nidhard, 1681.

Francis Blondel, 1686.
It is not the oak, the ash, or

Alexander VIII. (Pope), 1691. the elm, or any of the robust

Sam. Pitiscus, 1717. d. Utrecht. trees of the forest, which we

Charles, Duke of Shrewsbury, consider as beautiful; they are

1718. d. Isleworth. awful and majestic ; they in

inDan. Francis Voisin, 1718. spire a sort of reverence. It is

Frederick Augustus I. (of Po

land), 1733. d. Warsaw.
the delicate myrtle, it is the
orange, it is the almond, it is

d it is Sir Hew Dalrymple, 1737.
the jessamine, it is the vine,

Ant.de Senecai, 1737. d. Macon. which we look on as vegetable

George Lambert, 1765.
beauties.—Burke.

William Aiton, 1793. d. Kew.
Wm. Visc. Barrington, 1793.

Dr. John Lempriere, 1824.
Obits of the Latin Church.
St. Ignatius (Theophorus), Bp.

of Antioch, Martyr, 107. There is no wisdom without St-Pionius, of Smyrna, M. 250. honesty; all else is but art and St. Kinnia, Virgin of Ireland, cunning, which only makes good d. 5th Century.

the present, but looks not to the St. Bridgit (or Bride), Patroness furthest end. Truth hath but one of Ireland, d. 523.

way, and one face. St. Sigebert II. King of Austra

King James. sia, d. 656.

Affections, like the conscience, are rather to be led than drawn; and it is to be feared, they that marry where they do not love, will love where they do not marry.

Fuller.

It was observed, by one of the Fathers, that Christ's coat, indeed, had no seam, but the church's vesture was of divers colours.

acts.

SEPTUAGESIMA SUNDAY, was established by Gregory the Great, one of the best of the Popes, about the beginning of the seventh century, as a preparative for the Lent and Easter solemnities, and is so called from its falling on the seventieth day preceding Low Sunday, when the high feast of Easter, in remembrance of our Saviour's resurrection, terminated. It is movable with the Paschal moon, but fixed relatively the second week before Shrove (i. e. Quinquagesima) Sunday, and the ninth from Easter DAY.-See 5th April.

The dedication of a temple to Juno Sospita (the preserver), is mentioned on this day as a Roman festival. Cicero describes the goddess as one who is never seen, even in a dream, without a goat-skin, a spear, a little shield, and broad sandals. There is a small brass image of her in the Florence Gallery, but mutilated, and the feet are bare. It is not extravagant to identify this lady with the Pallas of the Greeks.

Edward III. is crowned at Windsor, 1327, in his fifteenth year,

Edward, Duke of York (Edward IV.) revenges his father's death by a signal victory over the royalists, commanded by Jasper, Earl of Pembroke, at Mortimer's Cross, in Herefordshire, 1461.

Lord Burleigh signs the Commission, “ penned" by himself, for the execution of the Queen of Scots, directed to the Earls of Shrewsbury, Kent, Derby, Cumberland, and Pembroke (Shakspeare's patron), 1587.

The artificial stream, named the New River, is begun by Sir Hugh Middleton, from two springs, one in the parish of Amwell, the other near Ware (called Chadwell), in Hertfordshire, the waters of which he united,

1608. Although eight hundred bridges were constructed, and six hundred workmen were generally employed during the period of more than five years, over a surface of thirty-nine miles, the projector's disbursements appear to have not exceeded 16,0001. money of that day.

The Royal Sovereign, man-of-war, is burnt at Chatham, 1696. The levies of money for building this noble vessel caused the Rebellion. War is declared against England and Holland by the French, 1793. The Bell Rock Light-house, on the Scotch coast, is illumined, 1811.

An eruption of the volcano of Albay, in Luconia, one of the Philippine Isles, 1814, which destroyed five towns, and twelve hundred persons.

The great winding-sheets that bury all things in oblivion are two ; deluges and, earthquakes.

Bacon.

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