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Fame, as a river, is narrowest where 'tis bred, and broadest afar off : so exemplary writers depend not on the gratuities of the world.- Davenant.

Day.

Births.

Deaths.

vil. Dr. Henry Moncrieff, 1750. St. Ronan, of Scotland, 603.

James Earl of Moray, (the

Bonny), murdered, 1592.
''Tis thou, thrice sweet and Francis Pithou, 1621.
gracious goddess, addressingmy-|Thos. E. of Exeter, 1622. Abbey.
self to Liberty, whose taste is Bp. (William) Bedell, 1642.
grateful, and ever will be sol Kilmore.
I till Nature herself shall change. Paul Pellisson-Fontanier, 1693.
1-No tint of words can spot! d. Versailles.

thy snowy mantle, or chymic Dr. John Hedwig, 1799.
| power turn thy sceptre into iron: Anne Radcliffe, 1823.d.Pimlico.
1 --with thee to smile upon him as Henry Neele, 1828.
| he eats his crust, the swain is
happier than his monarch.

She went to her death with?
Sterne. an unshaken firmness of mind,

and without changing the colour Obits of the Latin Church.

of her face, and thereby disco

vered the nobility of her descent St. Theodorus (Stratilates), M. to the spectators. Thus died at Heraclea, 319.

Mariamne ; a woman, excellent
St.Augulus( Augustus,or Aule), both for chastity, and greatness of }
"Bp. of London. M. 4th Cent. soul; but she wanted modera-
St. Tresain (or Tresanus), of tion, and had too much of con-

Ireland, d. 6th Century. tention in her nature; yet had
St. Richard, King of the West she all that can be said, in the
Saxons, d. Lucca, c. 722.

| beauty of her person, and in the St. Romuald, Abbot of Camal- majesty of her conversation. doli, d. 1027.

Love th Bir Josephus.

Jealousy, like the parricide, destroys that by which it lives, and is begotten.

Anon.

......... 86. ...........

The moon is thine : not worn indeed on high
With ostentatious pageantry, but set
With modest grandeur in thy purple zone;
Resplendent less, but of an ampler round.-Winter Evening,

Acts.

The Months. The gentle Numa appears to have adopted February as one of the months, in reference to the purgations observed near the calends, or new moon, at this season of the year. It corresponds with the twelfth moon Mechir, in the old, and the sixth in the modern Egyptian calendar ; with the sixth civil, and the twelfth ecclesiastical moon, Adar, of the Hebrews; with the sixth month, Schaharir, of the Persians; with the sixth moons, Jacathit, Anisheir, and Arats, of the Abyssinians, Copts, and Armenians ; with the sixth moons, Dystrus, Sebastus, and Dius, of the Syro-Macedonians, Paphians, and Bithynians; with the fifth solar month, Sabat, of the Syrians; with the ninth moon, Elaphebolion, of the Athenians; the sixth, Xanthicus, of the Macedonians ; and the second, Peritius, of their solar year; and with the eighth moons, Sahaben, and Sahaaban, of the Arabic and Turkish calendars. The Saxons named it Sol-month, (which marks the season); and it is called Sprokkel-month by the Dutch and Germans.-The origin of the months will commonly explain that of states, the sources of their power and happiness, with the manners of the people ; and therefore it is, that most definitions of the Roman calendar are either secondary or fanciful, as the objects were quite obscured, even in those eyes that best should know, by the revolutions of pride and refinement.

The seventh of the month Adar, was kept as a fast by the Jews, in memory of the death of their great prophet and legislator, Moses, B. C. 1451.-It was about this period, at the heliacal setting of the Pleiades; the time of the latter rains in Judæa, B. C. 134, that Antiochus Sidetes was besieging the city of Jerusalem, defended by John Hyrcanus, who had then assumed the Pontificate upon the murder of his father Simon, the benefactor. That year is memorable from its being Sabbatic, or the seventh year of rest, in which the Jews are forbidden either to plough, or to enjoy the fruits of their trees.

The tenths were given as a portion for the defence and preservation of every thing connected with religion.- Anon.

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She is of a short stature, well made, thin, and delicate, and moderately pretty : her eyes are so lively that she inspires reverence and respect, and even fear, wherever she turns them; nevertheless she is very short-sighted; her voice is deep, and masculine; and she understands the English, Latin, French, Spanish, and Italian tongues. As to the qualities of her mind, it may be said that she is rash, disdainful, and parsimonious.--Giov. Michele, M.D.LVII.

Day.

Births.

Weaths.

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St. Proclus, Patriarch of Con- William Longsword, 2d Earl of stantinople, 412.

Salisbury, 1250. k. Massoura. Mary I. of England, 1516, Count Robert, of Artois, 1250. } Greenwich.

killed, Massoura (Egypt).
Robert Burton, 1576, Lindley. St. Jerom Æmiliani, 1537.
William Earl of Pembroke, 1580, Noel Beda, 1537. Mount St.
Wilton.

Michael.
Samuel Butler, 1612, Strensham. Geoffrey Vallée, 1574. burned,
Peter Daniel Huet, 1630, Caen. Paris.
Gabriel Daniel, 1649, Rouen. Mary, of Scotland, beheaded,
Charles Henault, 1685, Paris. 1587. Abbey.
John Andrew de Luc, 1727, Alph. d'Elbene, 1608. d. Albi.
Geneva.

Ferdinand II. (of Germany),

1637.
Moses Amyraut, 1664.

Rich. Pendrell, 1671. d. London.
ohits of the Latin Church. Francis d'Escoubleau, 1686.
St. Paul, Bp. of Verdun, d. 631. Geo. Ashwell, 1693. Hanwell.
St. Cuthman, of England, d. c. Dr. George Sewell, 1727. d.
8th Century.

Hampstead.
St. Stephen, of Grandmont, d. Aaron Hill, 1750. Abbey.
Limoges, 1124.

Gaspar de Real, 1752. d. Paris.
St. John, of Matha, Founder of William Mitford, 1827. Exbury.

theOrder of Trinitarians, 1213.

She showeth a disposition to speak much, to be bold, to be pleasant, and to be very familiar. She delighteth to hear of hardiness and valiance; commending by name all approved hardy men of her country, although they be her enemies; and she concealeth no cowardice even in her friends. The thing that most she

thirsteth after is victory, and in respect of that wealth and all things seemnetb to } be contemptuous and vile.--Sir F. Knollys, M.D.LXVIII.

Old Ocean, hail! beneath whose azure zone
The secret deep lies unexplored, unknown.
Ye tempests! o'er my head congenial roll
To suit the mournful music of my soul;
In black progression, lo, they hover near,
Hail, social horrours! like my fate severe.-Falconer.

Acts.

The eighth days were held sacred to Neptune by the Athenians.

Papirius Cursor triumphs for his victory over the Samnites, B.C. 293. He dedicated on this occasion a temple to Quirinus, upon which was erected a sun-dial, the first ever seen at Rome. Before this period the progress of the day was noted by three intervals; the rising and setting of the sun, and the time of noon, which was proclaimed by the consular heralds when his disk appeared between the rostra and the house appointed for the reception of ambassadours. Rome, in the language of Cyneas, was then a temple, and the senate an assembly of kings. It was in B.C. 291 that the salutary God, Æsculapius, was brought in the form of a serpent from Epidaurus, and enshrined upon an island in the midst of the Tiber.-See Ovid's splendid fable. This physician and benefactor invented the probe, cathartics, dentition, and the use of bandages, and hence the respect for his memory.

Evelyn is at Paris, 1644 : “ I took coach and went to see the famous Jardin Royal, which is an enclosure walled in, consisting of all varieties of ground for planting and culture of medical simples. It is well chosen, having in it hills, meadows, wood and upland, natural and artificial, and is richly stored with exotic plants. In the middle of the parterre is a fair fountain. There is a very fine house, chapel, laboratory, orangery, and other accommodations for the president, who is always one of the king's chief physicians.”

Wycherley writes to Pope, N.s. 1707 : As often as fevers and agues attend the best constitutions from the worst air ; so does that malignant } {air of calumny soonest attack the sound and elevated in mind, as storms

of wind the tallest and most fruitful trees; whilst the low and weak for bowing and moving to and fro are secured from the violence of the tempest.” Is this flattery, or sympathy, or both ?

Avoid the syren, and escape the tempest.-Evelyn.

She is of a short stature, well made, thin, and delicate, and moderately pretty : her eyes are so lively that she inspires reverence and respect, and even fear, wherever she turns them; nevertheless she is very short-sighted; her voice is deep, and masculine; and she understands the English, Latin, French, Spanish, and Italian tongues. As to the qualities of her mind, it may be said that she is rash, disdainful, and parsimonious.-Giov. Michele, m.D.LVII.

Day.

Births.

Weaths.

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St. Proclus, Patriarch of Con-William Longsword, 2d Earl of stantinople, 412.

Salisbury, 1250. k. Massoura. Mary I. of England, 1516, Count Robert, of Artois, 1250. Greenwich.

killed, Massoura (Egypt).
Robert Burton, 1576, Lindley. St. Jerom Æmiliani, 1537.
William Earl of Pembroke, 1580, Noel Beda, 1537. Mount St.
Wilton.

Michael.
Samuel Butler, 1612, Strensham. Geoffrey Vallée, 1574. burned,
Peter Daniel Huet, 1630, Caen. Paris.
Gabriel Daniel, 1649, Rouen. Mary, of Scotland, beheaded,
Charles Henault, 1685, Paris. 1587. Abbey.
John Andrew de Luc, 1727, Alph. d'Elbene, 1608. d. Albi.
Geneva.

Ferdinand II. (of Germany),

1637.
Moses Amyraut, 1664.

Rich. Pendrell, 1671.d. London.
Obits of the Latin Church.

Francis d'Escoubleau, 1686.
St. Paul, Bp. of Verdun, d. 631. Geo. Ashwell, 1693. Hanwell.
St. Cuthman, of England, d. c. Dr. George Sewell, 1727. d.
8th Century.

Hampstead.
St. Stephen, of Grandmont, d. Aaron Hill, 1750. Abbey.
Limoges, 1124.

Gaspar de Real, 1752. d. Paris.
St. John, of Matha, Founder of William Mitford, 1827. Exbury.

the Order of Trinitarians, 1213.

She showeth a disposition to speak much, to be bold, to be pleasant, and to be very familiar. She delighteth to hear of hardiness and valiance; commending by name all approved hardy men of her country, although they be her enemies; and she concealeth no cowardice even in her friends. The thing that most she thirsteth after is victory, and in respect of that wealth and all things seemnetb to be contemptuous and vile.-Sir F. Knollys, M.D.LXVIII.

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