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•▼are that, the allotment out of a seaman"• pay it at best but a small pittance, in hit absence to support a wife and family,—but when that is suspended, when the husband returns no more as usual to those who are looking anxiously for him; when his presence, which sweetened their portion in life, which gladdened their hearts, and which brought with it contentment with their lot,—when this sacred charm is suddenly cut off, then hard indeed, is the fate of those bereft of rich a blessing. They mourn over their loss, they mourn, for what this world canDot restore; but in the midst even of their grief, they are awakened to a sen>e of their real condition, by the bitter pangs of want,—-destitute and forlorn they find themselves cast as strangers among us. Happily for them their ca«.e has been already taken up, and a partial attention to their condition, has served to avert immediate want; but, we would ask, and we hope that we shall not in vain ask for the assistance of our own subscribers, in finishing the good work of charity.

As there were grounds for believing that the Fairy might possibly have run for refuge to a port of Norway, the Salamander, Commander Henry, was directed to proceed to Flekkeroe, Stavanger, and Bergen, as noticed in our last, but returned without any tidings of her.

Before concluding, we may yet add, that the following is the last intelligence of the unfortunate vessel.

The Fairy is stated to have been seen hy a fisherman,* before one a-"., on the morning of the 13th of November, under her topsails, courses, jib, foretopmast staysail and driver, her courses hauled up, but not furled, off Thorpness, just outside the Sizewell Bank, a moderate breeze and moonlight night.

The Fairy is also reported to have been seen between Lowestoft and South wold, on the morning of the 13th, standing to the eastward on the starboard tack, under close reefed topsails,—and it is stated that a North Country brig saw her upset and go down, about four miles from land.

A fisherman named Benjamin Butcher, states, that at eleven A.m. on the morning of the 13th, being in his boat, about about five miles from Kessingland Church, this bearing about W.N.W., he passed close to a great number of papers, also a lug sail belonging to a gig, which appeared to have been but a short time in the water, but was unable to pick it up from the state of the sea.

A small box of papers, a triangular piece of board, the stand of an instrument, and the lid of a chart box, with the Fairy's name on it, the other things identified as her's also were picked up on the beach, on the coast of Suffolk, in the month of December.

A grating asserted to have belonged to the Fairy, and a spare oar *ere picked up on the 14th at 3 P.m., on the edge of the Brown Bank, by the Ebenezer fishing smack, south-east about thirty iniln from Lowestoft.

At the time the Fairy might he supposed to have got underway, about midnight off Orford, the weather becoming threatening with a heavy sea from the south-east, it would have been the last quarter flood', anl she. *ould probably be set to the northward with the first of the ebb. The weather being so bad as to preclude all possibility of doing at ything

* William Major, of Southwnlri. ENLARGED 8ERIE8 NO. 2 VOL. FOR 1841. 8 at Yarmouth, or even of obtaining shelter there, it seems likely that the Fairy would be keeping her wind for Harwich when the event occurred, and the articles picked up, as also the rest of the evidence concerning her, afford strong presumption that her wreck is not far from the coast about Southwold. The grating and oar picked up on 14th, might have been drifted out to the offing, as it appears the wind shifted to the south-west, and remained so all that day.

The following advertisement we perceive has been published by the Admiralty, and distributed along the coast.

£50 Reward.—Whereas, her Majesty's surveying vessel Fairy, commanded by Captain William Hewett, sailed from Harwich on the 12th of November last, and is believed to have been lost in the severe gale of the following morning, at a short distance from the coast of Suffolk.

My Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, do hereby offer a Reward of Fifty Pounds to any person or persons, who shall, within six months from this date discover, and first give notice to the Secretary of the Admiralty, of the situation in which her wreck lies, to be paid as soon as their lordships are satisfied by proper examination as to its identity.

By Command of their Lordships,

John Barrow. Admiralty, January, 1841.

Drsthuction Of Merchantmen.

Sir.—Revolting to humanity and every principle of justice, as every honest man must consider the act of conspiring, wilfully and fnnJulently, to destroy one's own ship, and incredible as may appear the execution of so vile a project, yet as plots of this deep die have sometimes been proved to exist, the welfare of society, as well as the interests of commerce require, that when offences of this flagitious character do occur, they ought to be thoroughly sifted and investigated; so that they may be brought fairly to light, and thus give a timely check to future mischiefs of the like nature, and kill the crocodile in the egg.

Without referring more particularly to the recent affairs of the Dryad and Isabel, which I hope may be properly dealt with; I will just observe that the intentional destruction of ships at sea, heinous as it is, is not a very new offence. I may mention, as a proof of this assertion, that some thirty years ago, an outward bound brig was scuttled off Brighton by the mate, by order of the captain; the mate, a youth of eighteen or twenty years of age, being told, on his promotion by the captain, that " if he acted to bis (the captain's) satisfaction, that was sufficient." As the thing happened within few miles of land, at break of day in the summer season, and within view of a fashionable beach, assistance was soon rendered, and the vessel run ashore; in which situation, when the tide ebbed, the augur-holes in the rtn, by which the deed was effected, were discovered high and dry.

This business of boring the bottom, as it took place on our own coast, was of course adjudicated at home. The case, from its singularity and enormity, made a great noise at the time, and though it happened so long ago, an authentic summary of it would, I think, have its uses at ibt present moment.

The particulars here dated, however, are merely from recollection, aod tbey are adduced with no other view than to shew, that as misdeeds of this kind are not without parallel, so they ought to be met with due vigilance by the parties concerned in the security of our wooden walls, and especially by " Poor Jack," who henceforth, I hope, under suspicious circumstances may be "allowed to think."

The late Lord Ellenborough observed, that, "it is fortunate for mankind, that great crimes are generally attended with corresponding folly and imbecility of mind, which leads to their detection." This maxim, however true and applicable to delinquency on terra firma, admits, I fear, of loo many exceptions in regard to intentional shipdestruction, committed on the high seas.

For my own part, I cannot avoid coming to the painful conclusion, that there are many more nefarious schemes of this kind contrived and hatched on shore than are actually perpetrated, and for this reason:— because of the great apparent facility (coupled with the absence of all suspicion,) of accomplishing such an act without detection; the real difficulty consisting, I apprehend, in finding an instrument, occupying the station of captain, sufficiently depraved to undertake and go through with the job, and consequently, that there are more wilful and fraudulent, though undiscovered cases of wreck, &c, than there are of crimes of the like nature that are detected, exposed, denounced, and punished.

An Old Tar.

Rock Off Cape De Gatte.

Sir—On reading over, just now, the report of the danger that we saw off Cape de Gatte, in August last, I have observed one or two mistakes from mis-copying, which I shall feel obliged if you will cause to be corrected at your earliest convenience.

These corrections can be made, thus:—

The OUTER Rock Off Cape Dk Gatte.

In Ihe October number of 1840, of the Nautical Magazine, at page "34, line 4 5, for " but I think it is most likely to be the only danger alluded to in the Book of Directions of 1750," read " but I think it is most likely to be the Outer danger alluded to in the Book of Directions of 1750." And again, at p. 735, line 12, for " N.ff.b.N.," read "N.E.b.N. by compass, that the white mark on the land to the eastward of the Cape, bore from this outer danger."

I feel positive that it was a sunken rock, as before described. It appeared quite green, and possibly might have had three or four fathoms water over it. I do not think it was longer than a line-of-battle ship's launch. The signal-man, on the fore royal yard, first reported it as being close on our Port bow. The look-out man at the jib-boom end next saw it. I instantly put the helm a-port, and ran to the port side of the poop, with the master, and all the officers that were there, when *e all saw it distinctly, on our beam, about two to three boats1 lengths only from us. Had we not been under all sail, and going between eight and nine knots, I certainly should have hove to, and examined it.

I am &c, J. T, Nicolas,

H.M.S. Re.Hcislr, Jan. 18, Devonporl.

(Continued from p. 63.—Cl crew lost, cs crew saved, d drowned.)

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Steam Docks At Deptford.—One of the greatest improvements of th« present day, and the most important to the metropolis and its nobis) river, is the projected magnificent docks for steamers at Deptford. There is no class of the whole community that will not feel the benefit of them, either in the avoidance of accident, the loss of life and property to common in the crowded pool, the saving of time and other inconveniences to merchants and travellers, and many other advantages which are too numerous to mention, but all of which render it most desirable that this important scheme should be carried into execution as early as possible.

Ariel Shoal.New Zealand.—The following notice of a dangerous shoal off Poverty Bay, is important to seamen.

"A reef, even with the water's edge, and about twelve miles off the nearest point of land near Poverty Bay, has lately been discovered by the master of tinAriel, with the following bearings from the ves-el:—middle of the reef, K. hN. one and a"half distance, Gable End Foreland, Nvs W., Toto Muta, 'W.&S.

£. M. Chaffehs, /{arbour-master, Tasmanian Gazette. Port NichoUu, New Zetland.

Shoal Near The Equator.—Captain Sprowle, of the Circassian, is stated to have seen a sand bank in the hollow of the sea, in lat. 1° S., long. 19° W., in the direct track of vessels to and from the South Atlantic. There are strong gTounds in addition to this for concluding that there-is some bank thereabouts. Our readers will no doubt remember the communicaton of Mr. Purdy in a former number of this work. (First Series, vol. for 1835, p. 611.) Some of the positions he alludes to come very near to that of the Circassian. We hope our seamen will be on the look out for this new danger, and transmit us any discoveries they may make concerning it.

Pkocuring Fresh Water From The Sea.—We understand that this great object is at length in a fair way of being accomplished; viz. the supplying of ships with the entire quantity (of the purest kind,) of the daily consumption of water from the sea.

The process by which this end is to be obtained is so simple that there seems no reason to doubt its working on board ship equal to the full expectations of the projectors; and the produce of water in proportion to the consumption of fuel, has we learn been brought to one gallon for every half pound of coal, or twenty tons for one :—thus permitting the holds of our men-of-war to be disencumbered of water, and five per cent, of the weight thereof of coal carried in lieu.

We are informed that the process is founded upon an extremely beautiful idea, which it is most extraordinary should so long have escaped the notice of chemical and scientific men, being actually under the eyes of every body for many years; but certainly quite new, as extended and applied by the parties who have now brought the process to public notice, and who are Captain Sir J. Stirling, Rn., and Mr. R. D. Middleton, lately a master in the merchant service.

We shall endeavour to obtain more particulars, and* watch the progress of this most important measure, and communicate them to our readers.

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